5e41cc9cfbd5bc88bf497d7af95dbb25aa6126c9

Posts Tagged ‘Plants’

Everything You Need to Know For Your Trip to St. Vincent & The Grenadines

buljol

Vincy culture doesn’t fit Caribbean stereotypes. Though Vincentians are known for their easygoing nature and hospitality towards visitors, you shouldn’t expect to see them lounging along the beach with tourists. They’re more often found debating politics or promoting tourism through agricultural trade and fishing. Many Vincentians spend their Sundays in church, and stores and restaurants are open only for limited hours. When you’re ready to exercise your credit card along shopping streets, you’ll fit in by wearing casual, light clothing. That said, some restaurants and venues require semi-formal attire, so be sure to check beforehand to avoid appearing underdressed.

When dining, try authentic dishes like buljol, (a breadfruit and saltfish medley), pumpkin soup and conch. Feel free to drink the local drinking water on St. Vincent – it’s safe. However, it’s best to stick to bottled water on The Grenadines. Also bear in mind the water on St. Vincent runs from the island’s mountain reserves and can have a chlorinated taste.  

As a parliamentary democracy rooted under British common law, St. Vincent & The Grenadines’ residents speak English. But you’ll likely hear a smattering of French patois (an informal dialect of French) during your stay. The East Caribbean Dollar (EC) is St. Vincent & The Grenadines’ official currency. One Eastern Caribbean dollar equals roughly $0.37. As far as tipping goes, it is considered polite to add gratuity, but most restaurants already include a 10 to 15% service charge on the bill. Major U.S. credit cards are accepted at most hotels and restaurants.

You’ll feel safe while exploring St. Vincent & The Grenadines, but be sure to keep your wits about you when interacting with local vendors (who have been known to scam unsuspecting tourists). You should also beware of manchineel trees: These seemingly innocuous trees produce poisonous sap that can cause painful blisters if touched. Some Manchineel are labeled with warning signs.

Vincy culture doesn’t fit Caribbean stereotypes. Though Vincentians are known for their easygoing nature and hospitality towards visitors, you shouldn’t expect to see them lounging along the beach with tourists. They’re more often found debating politics or promoting tourism through agricultural trade and fishing. Many Vincentians spend their Sundays in church, and stores and restaurants are open only for limited hours. When you’re ready to exercise your credit card along shopping streets, you’ll fit in by wearing casual, light clothing. That said, some restaurants and venues require semi-formal attire, so be sure to check beforehand to avoid appearing underdressed.

When dining, try authentic dishes like buljol, (a breadfruit and saltfish medley), pumpkin soup and conch. Feel free to drink the local drinking water on St. Vincent – it’s safe. However, it’s best to stick to bottled water on The Grenadines. Also bear in mind the water on St. Vincent runs from the island’s mountain reserves and can have a chlorinated taste.  

As a parliamentary democracy rooted under British common law, St. Vincent & The Grenadines’ residents speak English. But you’ll likely hear a smattering of French patois (an informal dialect of French) during your stay. The East Caribbean Dollar (EC) is St. Vincent & The Grenadines’ official currency. One Eastern Caribbean dollar equals roughly $0.37. As far as tipping goes, it is considered polite to add gratuity, but most restaurants already include a 10 to 15% service charge on the bill. Major U.S. credit cards are accepted at most hotels and restaurants.

You’ll feel safe while exploring St. Vincent & The Grenadines, but be sure to keep your wits about you when interacting with local vendors (who have been known to scam unsuspecting tourists). You should also beware of manchineel trees: These seemingly innocuous trees produce poisonous sap that can cause painful blisters if touched. Some Manchineel are labeled with warning signs.

Source