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Posts Tagged ‘public transportation’

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines – Traveler view

Association for International Road Travel

Motor vehicle crashes are the #1 killer of healthy US citizens in foreign countries.

In many places cars, buses, large trucks, rickshaws, bikes, people on foot, and even animals share the same lanes of traffic, increasing the risk for crashes.

Walking

Be smart when you are traveling on foot.

  • Use sidewalks and marked crosswalks.
  • Pay attention to the traffic around you, especially in crowded areas.
  • Remember, people on foot do not always have the right of way in other countries.
Riding/Driving

Choose a safe vehicle.

  • Choose official taxis or public transportation, such as trains and buses.
  • Ride only in cars that have seatbelts.
  • Avoid overcrowded, overloaded, top-heavy buses and minivans.
  • Avoid riding on motorcycles or motorbikes, especially motorbike taxis. (Many crashes are caused by inexperienced motorbike drivers.)
  • Choose newer vehicles—they may have more safety features, such as airbags, and be more reliable.
  • Choose larger vehicles, which may provide more protection in crashes.

Think about the driver.

  • Do not drive after drinking alcohol or ride with someone who has been drinking.
  • Consider hiring a licensed, trained driver familiar with the area.
  • Arrange payment before departing.

Follow basic safety tips.

  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.
  • Sit in the back seat of cars and taxis.
  • When on motorbikes or bicycles, always wear a helmet. (Bring a helmet from home, if needed.)
  • Avoid driving at night; street lighting in certain parts of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines may be poor.
  • Do not use a cell phone or text while driving (illegal in many countries).
  • Travel during daylight hours only, especially in rural areas.
  • If you choose to drive a vehicle in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, learn the local traffic laws and have the proper paperwork.
  • Get any driving permits and insurance you may need. Get an International Driving Permit (IDP). Carry the IDP and a US-issued driver’s license at all times.
  • Check with your auto insurance policy’s international coverage, and get more coverage if needed. Make sure you have liability insurance.
Flying
  • Avoid using local, unscheduled aircraft.
  • If possible, fly on larger planes (more than 30 seats); larger airplanes are more likely to have regular safety inspections.
  • Try to schedule flights during daylight hours and in good weather.
Medical Evacuation Insurance

If you are seriously injured, emergency care may not be available or may not meet US standards. Trauma care centers are uncommon outside urban areas. Having medical evacuation insurance can be helpful for these reasons.

Helpful Resources

Road Safety Overseas (Information from the US Department of State): Includes tips on driving in other countries, International Driving Permits, auto insurance, and other resources.

The Association for International Road Travel has country-specific Road Travel Reports available for most countries for a minimal fee.

Traffic flows on the left side of the road in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

  • Always pay close attention to the flow of traffic, especially when crossing the street.
  • LOOK RIGHT for approaching traffic.

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Jet Set–Approved: These Are the 11 Best Places to Travel Alone in the U.S.

Breanna Wilson
Viktoriia Leontieva/EyeEm/Getty Images

Given how many examples there are of women casting off their tired surroundings for the ready change of travelWild and Eat, Pray, Love, most notably—it may seem like you need to experience catastrophic pain before you can sightsee alone. But that’s not the case. If you simply think about the different annoyances that can go into group excursions, taking off on your own doesn’t seem like such a bad idea. You can book the place you want to stay, sleep as long as you’d like, make your schedule as packed or as leisurely as you please, and eat what you want, when you want. We asked three women with extensive globetrotting pasts—Helen Schuckers, Juliana Broste, and Breanna Wilson—to give their recommendations for the best places to travel alone in the U.S. Maybe this is the only sign you need to get away.

Helen Schuckers, Founder of Anchor and Pine Collective

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Austin, Texas

Austin offers an abundance of different activities ideal for any solo traveler looking for a mix of adventure, good eats, and a night on the town,” Helen notes. To start your trip off in an adventurous spirit, she recommends a self-guided kayak tour on Town Lake. When you get hungry, Helen says South Congress has the best food options. At night, make the most of the city’s live music. “There is a music venue that will suit your tastes and help you dance the night away with the locals,” she says.

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Kauai, Hawaii

“Kauai is one of the most peaceful places for solo travelers looking for solitude,” Helen says. “Take an overnight backpacking trip on the Nā Pali Coastline, an 11-mile stretch of rugged hiking that has some of the most beautiful sunsets and stargazing in the world.” Helen also recommends some secluded downtime at Polihale State Park, Secret Beach, and Keālia Beach when you want to relax.

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Portland, Oregon

Portland‘s accessibility to nature makes it an easy choice for outdoor enthusiasts,” Helen says. “However, Portland’s abundance of local businesses makes it a top choice for many solo wanderers looking for a good time without a lot of planning, too. Portland is a mecca of public transportation that can lead you to coffee shops, breweries, and donut shops with friendly locals always willing to have a chat.” Helen’s picks include Stumptown, Ecliptic Brewing, and the famous Voodoo Donuts.

Juliana Broste, Travel Writer, Traveling Jules

We the People Style

New York City

There are so many interesting things to see and do in New York City, you’ll almost never feel lonely. “Solo travelers will find countless organized tours to meet fellow travelers, and of course, Times Square is a famous place to put yourself in the middle of the action,” Juliana says. “But even something as simple as riding the subway can be an experience for people watching.”

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Denver

“At the foot of the Rocky Mountains, Denver is great for solo travelers, with world-class skiing and mountain excursions in its backyard,” Juliana notes. “Whether you catch a concert at Red Rocks Amphitheater or you grab a bike to explore the Mile High City, there are plenty of ways to take in the atmosphere.” She recommends stopping by the different brewpubs, breweries, and taprooms in the area, and bringing your camera to explore the street art in the RiNo neighborhood.

Viktoriia Leontieva/EyeEm/Getty Images

San Francisco

San Francisco is the ultimate place for those who want to do what they want, when they want. “You can have tacos in the Mission District, dim sum in Chinatown, or pizza and pasta in Little Italy,” Juliana says. “Or you can grab a bike and pedal over the Golden Gate Bridge and treat yourself to an ice cream cone before a return via ferry. Whatever you feel, San Francisco can dish it up!”

Breanna Wilson, Travel and Adventure Writer, Forbes

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Sisters, Oregon

“Sisters, just outside of Bend, is where it’s at,” Breanna says. “Not only is downtown Sisters so quaint—I can’t even do it justice with words—but Suttle Lodge is one of my all-time favorite places to head for a few days by myself. Everyone who stays there is friendly, and since it sits right on Suttle Lake, you can head out on canoes, kayaks, or stand-up paddle-boards whenever you need some adventure.” The lodge is known for musicians and bands that pop in, so you never know who might be playing a few songs while you watch the sunset on the lake.

Chris Condon/Getty Images

Scottsdale, Arizona

“Scottsdale is one of those places that continues to amaze me, no matter how many times I visit,” Breanna says. “I always discover a new adventure—like this last time, when I found myself skydiving from 17,500 feet over the Grand Canyon. Or the time before that, when I floated down Salt River in an inflatable kayak.” The locals are extremely friendly, and it’s an easy place to navigate on your own, making Scottsdale a great spot for those who are nervous to travel solo for the first time.

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Jackson Hole, Wyoming

If an outdoorsy vacation is what you’re craving, head to Jackson Hole. “With two National Parks just outside of Jackson Hole—Grand Teton National Park and Yellowstone National Park—there’s plenty to explore during the day, and places like Million Dollar Cowboy Bar (you’ll die when you see the horse saddle barstools) for adventures of a different kind at night,” Breanna says.

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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

For some of the most friendly locals and a buzzing city atmosphere, Pittsburgh is the place. “I might be a little biassed on this one because I’m from here, but local yinzers (what we call someone from Pittsburgh) are some of the most welcoming people in the world,” Breanna says. “Seriously, you can find yourself bonding over your love of sandwiches with French fries on them one second, and then find yourself being invited over to your new friend’s grandma’s house for homemade pierogies the next.”

Micah Marshall/EyeEm/Getty Images

Joshua Tree, California

Head to Joshua Tree when you need some quality ‘me’ time. “There’s just something about the energy there: You look out and see nothing but Joshua Trees for miles and feel this overwhelming sense of calm,” Breanna says. “Plus, La Copine is one of my absolute favorite restaurants in the world, and Pappy + Harriet’s in Pioneertown is one of those venues that has never, ever disappointed.”

There’s just something about the energy there: You look out and see nothing but Joshua Trees for miles and feel this overwhelming sense of calm.

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